Mid-Week Balance: 25 April 2012

This week’s MWB is a bit of a combination–half of the posts fall into a theme and half of them are more “grab-bag.”  So, without further ado, here are resources for the week.  I hope that something meets a need or helps you grow.

Meditation and Mindfulness

I’m a huge fan of meditation practice, but I know that I have sometimes struggled with feeling like I’m “doing it right.”  I see some of that anxiety with clients when I recommend meditation, so I thought that this article by Adriana Barton in the Vancouver Globe and Mail provides some helpful tips for those who think, “I can’t meditate.

A common objection that I hear to the idea of starting a meditation practice is that there isn’t “enough time.” I thought that this piece from Dr. Rick Hanson exploring our habit of rushing was a wonderful response to that objection.  Maybe we all need and deserve to slow down a bit.

And from Dr. Elisha Goldstein, I appreciated this reflection on how spending time with those who are mindful of life’s shortness can help us remember to nurture and value our relationships.

Grab-bag Goodness

It’s not unusual for me to work with clients who often feel as though they are taken advantage of in relationships, or that they are unable to say no.  If that struggle sounds familiar to you, you may want to check out this post by Christy Matta, MA, in which she explores some concrete tools for expressing yourself before or if you feel that someone is taking advantage of you.

Linda Esposito, LCSW, often has a fresh take on issues that many of us have encountered.  In this post, she reminds you that you can decrease anxiety and control the information that comes at you simply by clicking an unsubscribe button.

Dr. Brene Brown is one of the writers that I stop and pay attention to.  I own her books, I read her blog, I recommend her TED talks to clients, and I pay close attention to her recommendations.  This week, I have a double header of Brene Brown for you.  The first post is one that was supposed to be in last week’s MWB, but got lost in the shuffle.  It is a reminder that sometimes, the most productive thing to do is nothing at all.  The second is a personal post, in which Dr. Brown shares her own experiences struggling with hurtful feedback.  I appreciated her honesty & courage in sharing these responses, and I also appreciated her reminder that, even though we can’t shield ourselves from all pain, we can choose to set limits on how and with whom we invest our time and effort.

That’s it for me this week.  As always, please feel free to share your own favorite resources and tools of the week.

 

Image Credit: Ann Becker-Schutte

Comments

  1. Linda Esposito says

    Great stuff here, Ann! Never would’ve read this particular BB post, had you not (graciously) included me in your MWB awesomeness :).

    It’s a privilege to be part of your Grab-bag Goodness. Brene’s post resonated b/c a) I loved the TED Vulnerability talk, and b) I had a similar experience–mind you, on a MUCH smaller scale. As in colossaly more intimate in reach. Regardless, same Powerpoint presentation re: anxiety trends, research and tx techniques for K-12 population, but two very different audience resonses. I prepared, researched, rehearsed (but not too much). The second group of MH professionals brought a lackluster vibe, to say the least.

    Yes, you can always blame it on “others’ projections,” and choose the high road, but in the end it hurts more for humanity’s sake, and for the profession. “If they’re this disengaged with me, what IS going on in session?” I couldn’t help but wonder…

    Thank you for the enlightened message to forge ahead, and recognize the naysayers for what they represent, and resist the urge to dismiss the negative commenters.

    • Dr. Becker-Schutte says

      Linda,

      I think that negativity in many forms is a big source of shame and silencing. Particularly for those of us who focus our professional lives on helping, intentional hurtfulness can feel bewildering and hurtful. I believe that the more of us who speak, who are courageous and compassionate, the less power that negativity will own. Thanks for sharing your story as well. And thanks for consistently writing in a way that is so fun to read and to share!

      Warmly,
      Ann

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