Mid-Week Balance: 11 April 2012

This week for MWB, I have a couple of themes, and an introduction to an important coping tool.  The first theme is coping after a setback or crisis–which fits in really nicely with my recent two part post about the fact that sometimes life just hurts.  The second theme is looking at our friendships and deciding how we will continue to engage with friends.  So, let’s get the resources rolling:

Coping with Crisis

Mara, at Medicinal Marzipan, is connected with an incredible community of writers and thinkers.  Her blog has a guest post this week from Carrie Hensley that was right on point for the “sometimes life hurts” series–it even starts with a Viktor Frankl quote.  She shares some of her own struggle to remain authentic and present during the “falling apart” moments of life.

The Leadership Freak blog was a new find for me this week, but the title of this post, “I’ve Been Knocked Down, Now What?” drew me right in.  I appreciate the perspective this writer brings to the hard moments in life, and I love the idea of “taking a knee.”

Managing Friendship

First, I found this article by Dr. Colleen Arnold, in which she outlines five “friendship litmus test moments.”  I found this post thought-provoking, because I often work with clients on identifying which of their relationships are healthy, and then developing strategies to cope with unhealthy relationships.

Then I found this piece by Julie Fanning, in which she challenges us to look at our own roles and responsibilities in relationships.  She suggests that, sometimes, we may eliminate relationships too quickly.  I found that the two posts together provide a very balanced look at our relationships.

Coping Tool

Dr. Lissa Rankin is the founder of the Owning Pink blog, and she shared this post about learning to be present in her body.  This is a “part one” post, and includes a fascinating list of benefits of being in your body.  If you enjoy it, be on the look out for the second part of post, in which Dr. Rankin promises some “how-to” suggestions.

That’s it for me this week!  I hope that you found something helpful or inspiring.  Please feel free to share your own favorite post or strategy for the week.

 

Image Credit: Photo by Ann Becker-Schutte

6 thoughts on “Mid-Week Balance: 11 April 2012

  1. This is a very exciting topic of being knocked down, and it is very provoking in stages of life to me. Being younger, I was knocked down to my knees from playing baseball, sliding into first base…then diving for tennis balls to win the game. In playing basketball, girls who were taller than me would push me down so I wouldn’t get the basketball. When I played football with the boys, they would knock me down so I wouldn’t score a touchdown. This was rough stuff and I liked it….I was just as tough as they were and I would hop right back up and the game would continue. Yes, I was determined to win. As I became an adult, I noticed that the eyes were no longer joyful, and there was a seriousness being reflected through disturbing eyes to hurt someone who was in the way of a competitive person. I realized that some people are very serious in life, and certain things are no longer a game. I also learned that you must be careful before you decide to go into the ring to fight someone – if you cannot win, do not go into the ring. There will always be people who will judge you, and normally it is more than a matter of ego, when your value as a person is what you will actually defend, is more than the issue you are fighting over. If you start on your knee with a prayer every day, when someone or something knocks you down to your knees, it is simply returning you back to your comfort zone of being honest with yourself. Either you will continue to try and fight, with or without injury, or submit to surrender and save yourself. Not every Fighter or fight is worth fighting.

    1. Zorro1014,

      What really struck me was your point about listening to our own inner wisdom and choosing which fights are worth our time and energy. Thank you for sharing your thoughts!

      Warmly,
      Ann

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