Mid-Week Balance: 16 November 2011

This is a bonus edition of MWB–two weeks in one post.  I have been collecting all kinds of good stuff for you while I was writing a bonus post for Veteran’s Day and enjoying the chance to guest host the Mental Health Online Support chat (Twitter hashtag #MHON, Wednesdays at 12:00 pm EST).  It has been true in the past and it’s true this time around, the bonus editions don’t have a theme, except that I thought each of these posts was helpful.  Enjoy the smorgasboard!

From Bodhipaksa at Wildmind’s meditation practice blogs, I found this piece on using lovingkindness meditation practice as a tool to counteract anxiety.  I appreciate that, as usual, this post includes some helpful information about how we process anxiety, and then a step-by-step practice that you can try out.

This piece from Mark at the Committed Parent blog is a nice complement to Bodhipaksa’s article.  Mark is consistently good at exploring current research about brain development and applying it to parenting.  What I appreciated about this article was Mark’s exploration of our inner critic from a neuroscience perspective.

Andrea Owens wrote a guest blog at Medicinal Marzipan that is also about the inner critic.  She takes it one step past the “why” of inner critics and moves into some practical suggestions for how to reduce the power of your inner critic.

Here’s an antidote to the inner critic from Anna Guest-Jolly of Curvy Yoga.  She shares an inspiring list of statements.  You can read them as being about yoga practice, or you can read them as being about your life.

Dr. Ashley Solomon, of Nourishing the Soul, talks about the value of pain in our lives, the difference between pain and suffering, and how we might transform suffering by transforming our perspective.  Oh, and she’s extending an invitation to participate in a blog series too.  Fun stuff!

Rosie Molinary has a beautiful post about planting the seeds of behavior change.  While she is specifically addressing issues of sexism and gender, I think that this perspective is an important one to take with any issue that feels too large for us to take on as individuals.

At the PsychCentral Mindfulness & Psychotherapy blog, Dr. Elisha Goldstein regularly shares some helpful insights.  I particularly appreciated this post inviting us to explore “how long negative feelings last.”  Experimenting with the things that feel most overwhelming to us is a good way to reduce their impact.

I also chose this post from Kendra of Voice in Recovery.  She’s celebrating her fourth year of sobriety, and I respect her passion to share her journey, to speak out, to reduce stigma, and to support health.  I also love the point that she made about how being healthy has become normal to her.  I think that we all need reminders that change can happen.

Marianne Elliott, the Zen Peacekeeper, wrote a post to contribute to the project In Good Company, where those who have struggled with depression and anxiety share their stories to help reduce the isolation that comes along with those experiences.  I love the idea of the project, and Marianne’s story is powerful and touching.

I hope that there was something here that met a need for you this week.  Please feel free to share your favorites.

 

Comments

  1. Carolyn Stone says

    Hi Ann,
    So much to choose from! Thanks for introducing me to The Committed Parent. I like this guy’s approach. You do a real service with these posts. And we all need help with the inner critics.
    Thanks,
    Carolyn

    • Dr. Becker-Schutte says

      Carolyn,

      You put your finger on the reason I keep the Mid-Week balance feature in the blog. I really love to find new resources to energize myself and offer diverse perspectives to my readers. So glad you found something to enjoy.

      Warmly,
      Ann

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>